Sydney College of the Arts, Object Art and Design 

Albata Labefac 2004
Albata Labefac 2004

Photographer: Peter Endersbe

Final Presented Images
Final Presented Images

Albata Labefac 2004 Photographer: Peter Endersbe

Pulled and Carved Glass 'Horns'
Pulled and Carved Glass 'Horns'

Hot pulled glass, with bone joints carved into the head, with space to allow the components to be attached to the body. Sand blasted finish.

Albata Labefac 2004
Albata Labefac 2004

Photographer: Peter Endersbe

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Albata Labefac (Underminer Clothed in White)

Sydney College of the Arts, Object Art and Design Major Work, Glass 2004


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Albata labefac, is a piece that draws on many different aspects of myself, and my interests. The final method of display is influenced by theories of collecting, documentation, preservation, museology, and a reverence for the artifact.

The Processes involved in the creation of the piece, as well as the quality of the final objects themselves all served to influence the concept, and the experience. Its presentation was to be reminiscent of the excited sensationalist reports of new discoveries of the Victorian era.

Lampworked Frog Specimen 2004
Lampworked Frog Specimen 2004

Blown Glass bell jar, lampworked borosilicate glass frog, timber base

Detail of Lampworked Frog 2004
Detail of Lampworked Frog 2004

Vessel 2004
Vessel 2004

Scarlet, white, and clear glass, blown vessel

Lampworked Frog Specimen 2004
Lampworked Frog Specimen 2004

Blown Glass bell jar, lampworked borosilicate glass frog, timber base

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Glass Works

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Artist statement

What I create is dictated by my personal interests at the time and the desire to create an object that is strong enough to stand on its own even when removed from its context. Much of what I have produced makes reference to historical themes and artifacts, which when translated into a work often produces a nostalgic and romantic interpretation. The history often aids in creating an atmosphere within the work that becomes part of the viewing experience. 
Working in glass provides the opportunity to explore ideas in a relatively non -conventional manner, while also challenging my ingenuity, skill, and the possibilities of the material. All combine to resolve the concept in an interesting and unexpected manner. Glass also allows me to explore my aesthetic, as I am able to create works whose subject matter may not be viewed as beautiful but the inherent qualities of the glass allow it to be so.

Untitled 2003
Untitled 2003

Untitled 2003
Untitled 2003

Clay Pan 2002
Clay Pan 2002

A quick little study, sculpture

Untitled 2003
Untitled 2003

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Selected Sculptural Work

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